• Starting the conversation

    We are often contacted by worried parents for advice on how to help their teens stay safe at Schoolies. Start the conversation early, ask questions, share important information and don't shy away from the 'awkward' topics.

  • Staying safe

    To help you actively play a part in setting your teen up for a healthy and safe Schoolies, below you will find some key areas and advice that we encourage you to discuss with your teen leading up to their end of year celebrations.

  • Support on the Gold Coast

    Every year, we put on the Safer Schoolies Gold Coast Response to ensure the holiday period is as safe as possible for school leavers, local residents, businesses and the community in general.

  • Rights and responsibilities

    Regardless of where your teen is choosing to celebrate Schoolies, it’s important that they are aware of the laws surrounding alcohol, drugs and responsible behaviour may be different in each state or country.

We are often contacted by worried parents for advice on how to help their teens stay safe at Schoolies. Our answer is to bite the bullet and start talking about Schoolies as soon as possible so that they involve you in their plans from the start. Start the conversation early, ask questions, share important information and don't shy away from the 'awkward' topics.

It's important in these conversations that you reinforce your teen’s rights and responsibilities as well as the risks involved in being away from home. Good choices make great futures.

Starting the conversation

Where to start?

  • It’s likely your teen will have started thinking about, and planning Schoolies long before they hit Year 12, so the earlier you open Schoolies dialogue with them, the better
  • Encourage open communication with your teen – stay calm, don’t lecture, listen and avoid conflict.
  • Have the tough conversations with your teen – communicate your expectations and concerns, provide clear reasons for your decisions but don’t forget to invite and explore their opinions too
  • Ask them why you shouldn’t be worried – this will often put the onus back on them to actually think about and communicate what strategies they will put in place to keep themselves safe
  • Negotiate and set boundaries together – negotiating gives you and your teen the chance to work through different scenarios together of how to keep them safe. It also sends the message to your teen that you trust them and their ability to make good choices
  • Ask how they’re feeling about Schoolies - let them know that they can come and talk to you about it at any time.
  • Download our Schoolies checklists - resources that provide a great starting point for parents/guardians (PDF, 104 KB) parents/guardians (RTF, 1.5 MB) and schoolies (PDF, 104 KB) schoolies (RTF, 1.5 MB) to start preparing for Schoolies.
  • Sign up to receive our Safer Schoolies info for parents newsletter straight to your inbox.

And remember, it’s okay for you to communicate that you don’t want your teen to go to Schoolies. (If they are under the age of 18, it’s also okay for you to not allow them to).

A great place to start with your planning is our Schoolies Checklist for Parents.

This great resource provides handy tips, reminders and timing to take the worry out of helping your soon-to-be-schoolie prepare for a safe Schoolies.